have something in common with something

have something in common with something
have (something) in common (with (someone/something)) to share interests or characteristics.

What these very old objects have in common is that they were all stolen and smuggled out of the country.

What does the new model have in common with earlier versions?

Usage notes: also used in the forms have nothing in common and have a lot in common:

The two women had absolutely nothing in common.

The two men had a lot in common and got along well.


New idioms dictionary. 2014.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • have something in common with something — have something in common (with something) phrase to have the same features as something else This area obviously has a lot in common with other inner city areas. Thesaurus: to be similar to, or the same as, something or someonesynonym Main entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • have something in common with somebody — have sth in common (with sb) idiom (of people) to have the same interests, ideas, etc. as sb else • Tim and I have nothing in common./I have nothing in common with Tim. Main entry: ↑commonidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • have something in common with someone — have (something) in common (with (someone/something)) to share interests or characteristics. What these very old objects have in common is that they were all stolen and smuggled out of the country. What does the new model have in common with… …   New idioms dictionary

  • have in common with something — have (something) in common (with (someone/something)) to share interests or characteristics. What these very old objects have in common is that they were all stolen and smuggled out of the country. What does the new model have in common with… …   New idioms dictionary

  • have something in common with — have (something) in common (with (someone/something)) to share interests or characteristics. What these very old objects have in common is that they were all stolen and smuggled out of the country. What does the new model have in common with… …   New idioms dictionary

  • have (something) in common — (with (someone/something)) to share interests or characteristics. What these very old objects have in common is that they were all stolen and smuggled out of the country. What does the new model have in common with earlier versions? Usage notes:… …   New idioms dictionary

  • have in common with someone — have (something) in common (with (someone/something)) to share interests or characteristics. What these very old objects have in common is that they were all stolen and smuggled out of the country. What does the new model have in common with… …   New idioms dictionary

  • have in common with — have (something) in common (with (someone/something)) to share interests or characteristics. What these very old objects have in common is that they were all stolen and smuggled out of the country. What does the new model have in common with… …   New idioms dictionary

  • have something in common with someone — have something in common (with someone) phrase to have the same interests or opinions as someone else We’ve got such a lot in common. I don’t think they’ve got much in common with their neighbours. Thesaurus: to be similar to, or the same as,… …   Useful english dictionary

  • To have something on the stock — Stock Stock (st[o^]k), n. [AS. stocc a stock, trunk, stick; akin to D. stok, G. stock, OHG. stoc, Icel. stokkr, Sw. stock, Dan. stok, and AS. stycce a piece; cf. Skr. tuj to urge, thrust. Cf. {Stokker}, {Stucco}, and {Tuck} a rapier.] 1. The stem …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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